Pedestrian Killed in Southwest Houston

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A pedestrian has died after being struck by a vehicle in southwest Houston. The 23 year old woman was crossing the street with her six year old daughter, when a turning pickup truck hit both mother and child. Both were taken to the hospital. The mother died at the hospital and the daughter was treated and released. The driver was questioned at the scene and released.

The causes of this pedestrian accident are unknown. In many pedestrian accidents involving a motor vehicle, the driver of the vehicle is responsible for the accident. Tragically, a pedestrian is injured every eight minutes in the United States. Almost 5,000 pedestrians are killed in motor vehicle accidents and another 70,000 are injured.

Pedestrians who are struck by automobiles typically suffer serious injuries. Some of the most common injuries pedestrians incur in accidents with automobiles include broken bones, internal injuries, brain injuries, and spinal cord injuries. In some instances the pedestrians are killed.

The vast majority of accidents involving an automobile and pedestrian occur in urban areas. Typically, the speed at which the vehicle is travelling determines the severity of the pedestrian’s injuries – even small increases in speed can have a huge impact on the pedestrian’s chances of surviving the accident.

In pedestrian-automobile accidents, the majority are caused by the driver’s failure to yield. In about a third, the automobile driver flees the scene. Many of the accidents also involve a turning vehicle.

If you have been injured in an automobile accident as a pedestrian, you should speak with an attorney. Call the Houston pedestrian accident attorneys at Kennedy Hodges at 855-947-0707. Our team can help. Call us today to learn more or visit us on Twitter to learn more. 

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